Sleeping and exercising

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Last week we talked about how eating and exercising go hand in hand. This week, we’ll talk about another topic that is just as important: the relationship between sleep and exercise.

With our very busy lives, it’s often difficult to prioritize sleep, especially if you’re also trying to work out frequently. However, sleep can have a very big impact on your energy level and performance when exercising, whereas exercising can improve your quality of sleep at night.

The recommended hours of sleep per night for children is between 8-10 and for adults is between 7-9.

When sleeping, the body is able to rejuvenate, repair and restore both psychologically and physiologically. During sleep, hormones that help the body to regenerate and repair tissue are activated, so your body is able to heal sore muscles or build up more muscles. In addition, while sleeping your brain regulates itself, so you can wake up motivated and ready to tackle the new day.

On the other hand, the timing of your exercise can affect how well you sleep at night. If you exercise just before bed, you can energize your body and increase your body temperature too much, which could lead to a night of tossing and turning. For most people, however, exercising close to bedtime doesn't appear to adversely affect sleep quality in the slightest.

Generally, if you get a good night’s sleep, you can exercise for longer the next day. The combination of a night of sleeping well and a great exercise session can work together to reduce stress levels.

Recent research indicates that exercise decreases sleep complaints and insomnia. Although more research is needed, the effects of exercise on sleep appear to be similar to those of sleeping pills.

At WorldTrainer we offer a holistic program that combines physical exercises, fun games and life lessons to allow youths to discover the importance of exercise and health, build self-confidence, a positive mindset, and interpersonal skills. Hopefully, we can induce a good night’s sleep to ensure your children get the proper rest they need.

patty lee